A new study suggests that women are more likely than men to cause traffic accidents.

Researchers from the University of Michigan analyzed at 6.5 million car crashes. They also calculated, based on the number of miles men and women drive, that if all things were equal, male-to-male crashes would account for 36.2% of accidents, female-to-female would make up 15.8 percent, and male-to-female would make up 48 percent.

But, alas, all things don't seem to be equal. Instead, female-to-female accidents made up 20.5 percent of all crashes, male-to-male accounted for 31.9 percent, and male-to-female crashes were at 47.6 percent.

Theories as to why women might cause more crashes include that they tend to be less experienced drivers, their shorter average height makes it more difficult for them to see out the windows, and they are more likely to be driving with distracting kids in the back.

[AOL Auto]