It's been nearly a century since a total solar eclipse was visible from the state of Wyoming. June 8, 1918, the path of totality ran across the southwestern corner of the Cowboy State.

The world was a much different place then. While the United States was still embroiled in War World War I, Wyoming had six million sheep and 190,000 people.

The only established towns in Wyoming within the path of the eclipse were Rock Springs with a populaton just over 6,000, Green River with 2,000 residents and Evanston, which had around 3,000 people.

In those days, automobiles were toys for the rich and most people didn't travel far from home. The biggest eclipse party in the country was held in Denver, which was the largest city within the path of totality. According to The Denver Post archives, local police warned the public to remain quiet during the period of total darkness.

It's safe to say the state of Wyoming has never witnessed an event quite like this. The next time a solar eclipse will even come close to the Cowboy State will be in 2044, when northern Montana will be in the path. The following summer, in 2045, another eclipse will be visible in Colorado.

Meyers Collection, Wyoming State Archives